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Paper Abstract

Presently, dedicated instruments at large telescopes (SPHERE for the VLT, GPI for Gemini) are about to discover and explore self-luminous giant planets by direct imaging and spectroscopy. The next generation of 30m-40m ground-based telescopes, the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs), have the potential to dramatically enlarge the discovery space towards older giant planets seen in reflected light and ultimately even a small number of rocky planets. EPICS is a proposed instrument for the European ELT, dedicated to the detection and characterization of Exoplanets by direct imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry. ESO completed a phase-A study for EPICS with a large European consortium which - by simulations and demonstration experiments - investigated state-of-the-art diffraction and speckle suppression techniques to deliver highest contrasts. The paper presents the instrument concept and analysis as well as its main innovations and science capabilities. EPICS is capable of discovering hundreds of giant planets, and dozens of lower mass planets down to the rocky planets domain.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 July 2010
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7735, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy III, 77352E (15 July 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.856850
Show Author Affiliations
Markus Kasper, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (Germany)
Jean-Luc Beuzit, Lab. d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, CNRS (France)
Christophe Verinaud, Lab. d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, CNRS (France)
Raffaele G. Gratton, INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Florian Kerber, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (Germany)
Natalia Yaitskova, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (Germany)
Anthony Boccaletti, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon (France)
Niranjan Thatte, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Hans Martin Schmid, ETH Zürich (Switzerland)
Christoph Keller, Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)
Pierre Baudoz, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon (France)
Lyu Abe, Lab. Fizeau, CNRS, Univ. de Nice Sophia Antipolis (France)
Emmanuel Aller-Carpentier, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (Germany)
Jacopo Antichi, Lab. d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, CNRS (France)
Mariangela Bonavita, INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Kjetil Dohlen, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, CNRS, Univ. de Provence (France)
Enrico Fedrigo, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (Germany)
Hiddo Hanenburg, ASTRON (Netherlands)
Norbert Hubin, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (Germany)
Rieks Jager, ASTRON (Netherlands)
Visa Korkiakoski, Lab. d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, CNRS (France)
Patrice Martinez, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (Germany)
Dino Mesa, INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Olivier Preis, Lab. d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, CNRS (France)
Patrick Rabou, Lab. d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, CNRS (France)
Ronald Roelfsema, ASTRON (Netherlands)
Graeme Salter, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Mathias Tecza, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Lars Venema, ASTRON (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7735:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy III
Ian S. McLean; Suzanne K. Ramsay; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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