Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Path to the stars: the evolution of the species in the hunting to the GRBs
Author(s): Fabrizio Vitali; Guido Chincarini; Mario Zannoni; Stefano Covino; Emilio Molinari; Stefano Benetti; Carlotta Bonoli; Favio Bortoletto; Enrico Cascone; Rosario Cosentino; Francesco D'Alessio; Paolo D'Avanzo; Vincenzo De Caprio; Massimo Della Valle; Alberto Fernandez-Soto; Dino Fugazza; Enrico Giro; Demetrio Magrin; Giuseppe Malaspina; Lech Mankiewicz; Raffaella Margutti; Ruben Mazzoleni; Luciano Nicastro; Alberto Riva; Marco Riva; Ruben Salvaterra; Paolo Spanò; Monica Sperandio; Mauro Stefanon; Gino Tosti; Vincenzo Testa
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

During the last years, a number of telescopes and instruments have been dedicated to the follow-up of GRBs: recent studies of the prompt emission (see for instance GRB080319B) and of their afterglows, evidenced a series of phenomena that do not fit very well within the standard fireball model. In those cases, optical observations were fundamental to distinguish among different emission mechanisms and models. In particular, simultaneous observation in various optical filters became essential to understand the physics, and we discovered the need to have a detailed high time resolution follow up. Finally, recent observations of the polarization in GRB 090102 clearly indicate the presence of an ordered magnetic field favoring the electromagnetic outflows models. This is, however, only one case and, in order to detail properly the model, we need a bit of statistics. But, after the Swift launch, the average observed intensity of GRB afterglows showed to be lower than thought before. Robotic telescopes, as demonstrated by REM, ROTSE, TAROT, etc. (but see also the GROND set up) is clearly the winning strategy. Indeed, as we will also briefly discuss later on, the understanding of the prompt emission mechanism depends on the observations covering the first few hundreds seconds since the beginning of the event with high temporal resolution. To tackle these problems and track down a realistic model, we started the conceptual design and phase A study of a 4 meter class, fast-pointing telescope (40 sec on target), equipped with multichannel imagers, from Visible to Near Infrared (Codevisir/Pathos). In the study we explored all the different parts of the project, from the telescope to the instrumental suite to data managing and analysis, to the dome and site issue. Contacts with industry have been fruitful in understanding the actual feasibility of building such a complex machine and no show stoppers have been identified, even if some critical points should be better addressed in the Phase B study. In this paper, we present the main results of the feasibility study we performed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 July 2010
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 7733, Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes III, 77330W (28 July 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.856841
Show Author Affiliations
Fabrizio Vitali, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy)
Guido Chincarini, Univ. degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy)
INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Mario Zannoni, Univ. degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy)
Stefano Covino, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Emilio Molinari, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy)
INAF-Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (Spain)
Stefano Benetti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Carlotta Bonoli, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Favio Bortoletto, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Enrico Cascone, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte (Italy)
Rosario Cosentino, INAF - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (Spain)
Francesco D'Alessio, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy)
Paolo D'Avanzo, Univ. degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy)
INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Vincenzo De Caprio, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Massimo Della Valle, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte (Italy)
International Ctr. for Relativistic Astrophysics (Italy)
Alberto Fernandez-Soto, Univ. de Cantabria (Spain)
Dino Fugazza, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Enrico Giro, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Demetrio Magrin, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Giuseppe Malaspina, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Lech Mankiewicz, Ctr. for Theoretical Physics, Academy of Science (Poland)
Raffaella Margutti, Univ. degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy)
Ruben Mazzoleni, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Luciano Nicastro, INAF - IASF Bologna (Italy)
Alberto Riva, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino (Italy)
Marco Riva, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)
Ruben Salvaterra, Univ. degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy)
Paolo Spanò, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Monica Sperandio, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Mauro Stefanon, Observatori Astronomic Univ. de València (Spain)
Gino Tosti, Univ. degli Studi di Perugia (Italy)
Vincenzo Testa, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7733:
Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes III
Larry M. Stepp; Roberto Gilmozzi; Helen J. Hall, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top