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Proceedings Paper

Extreme health sensing: the challenges, technologies, and strategies for active health sustainment of military personnel during training and combat missions
Author(s): Mark Buller; Alexander Welles; Odest Chadwicke Jenkins; Reed Hoyt
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Paper Abstract

Military personnel are often asked to accomplish rigorous missions in extremes of climate, terrain, and terrestrial altitude. Personal protective clothing and individual equipment such as body armor or chemical biological suits and excessive equipment loads, exacerbate the physiological strain. Health, over even short mission durations, can easily be compromised. Measuring and acting upon health information can provide a means to dynamically manage both health and mission goals. However, the measurement of health state in austere military environments is challenging; (1) body worn sensors must be of minimal weight and size, consume little power, and be comfortable and unobtrusive enough for prolonged wear; (2) health states are not directly measureable and must be estimated; (3) sensor measurements are prone to noise, artifact, and failure. Given these constraints we examine current successful ambulatory physiological status monitoring technologies, review maturing sensors that may provide key health state insights in the future, and discuss unconventional analytical techniques that optimize health, mission goals, and doctrine from the perspective of thermal work strain assessment and management.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 May 2010
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7666, Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense IX, 766610 (5 May 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.853101
Show Author Affiliations
Mark Buller, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (United States)
Brown Univ. (United States)
Alexander Welles, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (United States)
Odest Chadwicke Jenkins, Brown Univ. (United States)
Reed Hoyt, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7666:
Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense IX
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

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