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Proceedings Paper

Free-space optical channel characterization in the maritime environment
Author(s): Juan C. Juarez; Joseph E. Sluz; Charles Nelson; Marc B. Airola; Michael J. Fitch; David W. Young; David Terry; Frederic M. Davidson; John R. Rottier; Raymond M. Sova
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Paper Abstract

The performance of a free-space optical (FSO) communications link in a maritime environment was evaluated during two field trials conducted off the mid-Atlantic coast near Wallops Island, VA, in July and September 2009. Bidirectional, ship-to-shore data links operating at 2.5 Gbps and utilizing commercial, single-mode adaptive optics terminals were set up between a lookout tower located on Cedar Island, VA and a Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory research vessel over a range of 2-22 km (optical horizon). This paper presents the test configuration, discusses the overall performance of the FSO channel, and compares it to the available turbulence and weather measurements. Additionally, modeling of the link configuration is presented, and comparisons are made to data measured throughout the experiment such as received power, received beam diameter, and local The performance of a free-space optical (FSO) communications link in a maritime environment was evaluated during two field trials conducted off the mid-Atlantic coast near Wallops Island, VA, in July and September 2009. Bidirectional, ship-to-shore data links operating at 2.5 Gbps and utilizing commercial, single-mode adaptive optics terminals were set up between a lookout tower located on Cedar Island, VA and a Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory research vessel over a range of 2-22 km (optical horizon). This paper presents the test configuration, discusses the overall performance of the FSO channel, and compares it to the available turbulence and weather measurements. Additionally, modeling of the link configuration is presented, and comparisons are made to data measured throughout the experiment such as received power, received beam diameter, and local Cn2.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 May 2010
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7685, Atmospheric Propagation VII, 76850H (4 May 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.852645
Show Author Affiliations
Juan C. Juarez, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)
Joseph E. Sluz, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)
Charles Nelson, The Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Marc B. Airola, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)
Michael J. Fitch, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)
David W. Young, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)
David Terry, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)
Frederic M. Davidson, The Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
John R. Rottier, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)
Raymond M. Sova, The Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7685:
Atmospheric Propagation VII
Linda M. Wasiczko Thomas; Earl J. Spillar, Editor(s)

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