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Proceedings Paper

Development of a 2.0W at 60K single-stage coaxial pulse tube cryocooler for long-wave infrared focal plane array applications
Author(s): H. Z. Dang; L. B. Wang; Y. N. Wu; K. X. Yang; S. S. Li; W. B. Shen
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Paper Abstract

A 2.0W@60K single-stage coaxial pulse tube cryocooler has been developed to provide reliable low-vibration cooling for the space-borne long wave infrared focal plane array. The coaxial configuration result in a compact system and the inertance tube together with a gas reservoir serves as the only phase-shifting to realize a highly reliable system. The inertance tube consists of two parts with different inner diameter and length to obtain the desirable phase relationship. Both cold tip and warm flange integrated with fine slit heat exchanges fabricated with electro discharge machining technology to enhance heat exchange performance. A split Oxford-type linear compressor with dual-opposed piston configuration is connected to the cold finger with a 30 cm flexible metallic tube. The overall weight without control electronics is below 8 kg. The preliminary experiments show that a no-load temperature of 46 K and a cooling power of 2 W at 60 K with 104 W of input power at 300K reject temperature have been achieved.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 May 2010
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7660, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXVI, 76602S (3 May 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.850104
Show Author Affiliations
H. Z. Dang, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (China)
L. B. Wang, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (China)
Y. N. Wu, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (China)
K. X. Yang, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (China)
S. S. Li, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (China)
W. B. Shen, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7660:
Infrared Technology and Applications XXXVI
Bjørn F. Andresen; Gabor F. Fulop; Paul R. Norton, Editor(s)

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