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Proceedings Paper

Comparison of real and simulated SAR imagery of ships for use in ATR
Author(s): N. Ødegaard; A. O. Knapskog; C. Cochin; B. Delahaye
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Paper Abstract

Collecting real data to build a database for Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) in SAR imagery can be an overwhelming task. Simulated SAR images of targets are desirable. To use simulations for ATR one has to make sure they are good enough for discriminating among the different classes. This paper investigates the similarities between SAR images of ships simulated using a phenomenological SAR simulation tool and real data of the same targets collected with PicoSAR and TerraSAR-X. The study has been completed by FFI using the DGA MOCEM LT software. MOCEM generates a SAR image from a CAD model based on the major scattering mechanisms of the target in a matter of minutes. Simulations of several ships are compared to real data. The results obtained are highly dependent on the imaging geometry, as well as the CAD model complexity and the materials chosen for the target. Using normalized cross correlation, the simulation from the correct class always has the highest correlation with the real one when the scatterers are spatially distributed in the image. In other geometries, when the scatterers are more concentrated, the results were not satisfying, and further testing using other materials, model complexities and comparison metrics is necessary.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 April 2010
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7699, Algorithms for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery XVII, 76990O (19 April 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.850057
Show Author Affiliations
N. Ødegaard, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (Norway)
A. O. Knapskog, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (Norway)
C. Cochin, Direction Générale de l'Armement (France)
B. Delahaye, Direction Générale de l'Armement (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7699:
Algorithms for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery XVII
Edmund G. Zelnio; Frederick D. Garber, Editor(s)

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