Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Carbon nanotube assisted photothermal therapy of skin cancers: pilot proof-of-principle study in a murine model
Author(s): Naiyan Huang; Hequn Wang; Jianhua Zhao; Harvey Lui; Mladen Korbelik; Haishan Zeng
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are a new type of nanomaterial with strong optical absorption. SWNTs also have intense Raman signals that facilitate convenient monitoring of their location within tissue thereby enabling noninvasive pharmacokinetic study. We hypothesize that SWNTs can absorb 785-nm laser light and generate significant local hyperthermia to destroy cancer cells and eradicate tumors. In this study a 785-nm diode laser is used for both Raman excitation and photothermal therapy. SWNTs are made water-soluble by functionalizing with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and administrated by intratumoral injection. C3H/HeN mice were injected subcutaneously with 2 million mouse squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) cells to create the tumor model. We conducted experiments with 100 mice divided into 10 different groups: control, SWNT only, 100 mW/cm2 laser irradiation only, 200 mW/cm2 laser irradiation only, and 6 treatment groups with different drug and light dose combinations (SWNTs 0.1, 0.5. 1 mg/ml, laser 100 and 200 mW/cm2). The treatment time was 10 minutes. The temperatures of the tumors irradiated by laser were monitored by an IR thermometer. Mice survival was observed for 45 days. The study revealed that the temperature within the tumors increased in a light- and drug-dose dependent manner. The optimized light and drug dose combinations (1 mg/ml + 120 J/cm2) resulted in tumor temperature elevation of 18.5°C and successful eradication of the tumors. This light dose is moderate and is as low as 1/10 of other published studies using nanomaterials. The Raman spectroscopy measurements suggest that SWNTs persisted within the tumor tissue for months.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 March 2010
PDF: 3 pages
Proc. SPIE 7548, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics VI, 75480H (4 March 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.848279
Show Author Affiliations
Naiyan Huang, The BC Cancer Agency Research Ctr. (Canada)
The Univ. of British Columbia & Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (Canada)
Hequn Wang, The BC Cancer Agency Research Ctr. (Canada)
The Univ. of British Columbia & Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (Canada)
Jianhua Zhao, The BC Cancer Agency Research Ctr. (Canada)
The Univ. of British Columbia & Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (Canada)
Harvey Lui, The BC Cancer Agency Research Ctr. (Canada)
The Univ. of British Columbia & Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (Canada)
Mladen Korbelik, The BC Cancer Agency Research Ctr. (Canada)
Haishan Zeng, The BC Cancer Agency Research Ctr. (Canada)
The Univ. of British Columbia & Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7548:
Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics VI
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen; Andreas Mandelis; Brian Jet-Fei Wong M.D.; Nikiforos Kollias; Henry Hirschberg M.D.; Kenton W. Gregory M.D.; Reza S. Malek; E. Duco Jansen; Guillermo J. Tearney; Steen J. Madsen; Bernard Choi; Justus F. R. Ilgner; Haishan Zeng; Laura Marcu, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top