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Proceedings Paper

Modeling of power and energy transduction of embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors for structural health monitoring
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Paper Abstract

This paper presents a systematic investigation of power and energy transduction in piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) for structural health monitoring (SHM). After a literature review of the state of the art, the paper develops a simplified pitch-catch model of power and energy transduction of PWAS attached to structure. The model assumptions include: (a) 1-D axial and flexural wave propagation; (b) ideal bonding (pin-force) connection between PWAS and structure; (c) ideal excitation source at the transmitter PWAS and fully-resistive external load at the receiver PWAS. Frequency response functions are developed for voltage, current, complex power, active power, etc. First, we examined PWAS transmitter and determined the active power, reactive power, power rating of electrical requirement under harmonic voltage excitation. It was found that the reactive power is dominant and defines the power requirement for power supply / amplifier for PWAS applications. The electrical and mechanical power analysis at the PWAS structure interface indicates all the active electrical power provides the mechanical power at the interface. This provides the power and energy for the axial and flexural waves power and energy that propagate into the structure. The sum of forward and backward wave power equals the mechanical power PWAS applied to the structure. The parametric study of PWAS transmitter size shows the proper size and excitation frequency selection based on the tuning effects. Second, we studied the PWAS receiver structural interface acoustic and electrical energy transduction. The parametric study of receiver size, receiver impedance and external electrical load gives the PWAS design guideline for PWAS sensing and power harvesting applications. Finally we considered the power flow for a complete pitch-catch setup. In pitch-catch mode, the power flows from electrical source into piezoelectric power at the transmitter; the piezoelectric conduction converts the electrical power into the mechanical interface power at the transmitter PWAS and then into the acoustic wave power travelling in the structure. The wave power arrives at the receiver PWAS and is captured at the mechanical interface between the receiver PWAS and the structure; the captured mechanical power is converted back into electrical power at the receiver PWAS and measured by the receiver electrical instrument. Our numerical simulation and graphical chart show the trends in the power and energy flow behavior with remarkable peaks and valleys that can be exploited for optimum design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 2010
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7647, Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2010, 76472P (1 April 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.847580
Show Author Affiliations
Bin Lin, Univ. of South Carolina (United States)
Victor Giurgiutiu, Univ. of South Carolina (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7647:
Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2010
Masayoshi Tomizuka, Editor(s)

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