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Proceedings Paper

Novel focused optoacoustic transducers for accurate monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration and oxyhemoglobin saturation: pre-clinical and clinical tests
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Paper Abstract

We developed an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive, accurate, and continuous monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration and venous oxyhemoglobin saturation by probing specific blood vessels. In this work we report the development and tests of novel, focused optoacoustic transducers that provide blood vessel probing with sub-millimeter lateral resolution. The focused transducers were incorporated in our highly portable, laser diode-based optoacoustic monitoring system for pre-clinical and clinical tests. Our studies demonstrated that: 1) the focused transducer response is linearly dependent on blood total hemoglobin concentration with a high correlation coefficient; and 2) the sub-millimeter lateral resolution provided higher specificity of blood vessel probing, in particular, for smaller blood vessels such as the radial artery (diameter 2-3 mm).

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 February 2010
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7564, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2010, 75641I (25 February 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.847084
Show Author Affiliations
Emanuel Särchen, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)
Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany)
Irina Petrova, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)
Yuriy Petrov, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)
Donald Prough, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)
Walter Neu, Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany)
Rinat O. Esenaliev, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7564:
Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2010
Alexander A. Oraevsky; Lihong V. Wang, Editor(s)

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