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Proceedings Paper

Fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT and endoscopic video for image-guided procedures
Author(s): M. J. Daly; H. Chan; E. Prisman; A. Vescan; S. Nithiananthan; J. Qiu; R. Weersink; J. C. Irish; J. H. Siewerdsen
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Paper Abstract

Methods for accurate registration and fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) with endoscopic video have been developed and integrated into a system for surgical guidance that accounts for intraoperative anatomical deformation and tissue excision. The system is based on a prototype mobile C-Arm for intraoperative CBCT that provides low-dose 3D image updates on demand with sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility, and also incorporates subsystems for real-time tracking and navigation, video endoscopy, deformable image registration of preoperative images and surgical plans, and 3D visualization software. The position and pose of the endoscope are geometrically registered to 3D CBCT images by way of real-time optical tracking (NDI Polaris) for rigid endoscopes (e.g., head and neck surgery), and electromagnetic tracking (NDI Aurora) for flexible endoscopes (e.g., bronchoscopes, colonoscopes). The intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) parameters of the endoscopic camera are calibrated from images of a planar calibration checkerboard (2.5×2.5 mm2 squares) obtained at different perspectives. Video-CBCT registration enables a variety of 3D visualization options (e.g., oblique CBCT slices at the endoscope tip, augmentation of video with CBCT images and planning data, virtual reality representations of CBCT [surface renderings]), which can reveal anatomical structures not directly visible in the endoscopic view - e.g., critical structures obscured by blood or behind the visible anatomical surface. Video-CBCT fusion is evaluated in pre-clinical sinus and skull base surgical experiments, and is currently being incorporated into an ongoing prospective clinical trial in CBCT-guided head and neck surgery.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 March 2010
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7625, Medical Imaging 2010: Visualization, Image-Guided Procedures, and Modeling, 762503 (3 March 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.844212
Show Author Affiliations
M. J. Daly, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital (Canada)
Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
H. Chan, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital (Canada)
E. Prisman, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
A. Vescan, Univ. of Toronto (United States)
S. Nithiananthan, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
John Hopkins Univ. (United States)
J. Qiu, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital (Canada)
R. Weersink, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital (Canada)
J. C. Irish, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Princess Margaret Hospital (Canada)
J. H. Siewerdsen, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital (United States)
Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
John Hopkins Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7625:
Medical Imaging 2010: Visualization, Image-Guided Procedures, and Modeling
Kenneth H. Wong; Michael I. Miga, Editor(s)

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