Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

A consideration of the signal-to-noise ratio in phase contrast mammography
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $17.00 $21.00

Paper Abstract

Recently, with developments in medicine, digital systems such as computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detector (FPD) systems are being employed for mammography instead of analog systems such as the screen-film system. Phase-contrast mammography (PCM) is a commercially available digital system that uses images with a magnification of 1.75x. To study the effect of the air gap in PCM, we measured the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and calculated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in PCM, and compared it to that in conventional mammography (CM). Then, to extend the SNR to the spatial frequency domain, we calculated the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) used by the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum of the pixel value (NPSΔPV), gradient of the digital characteristic curve, and number of X-ray photons. The obtained results indicated that the SFR of the PCM was as low as that of the CM with a grid. When the exposure dose was constant, the SNR of the PCM was the highest in all systems. Moreover, the NEQ and DQE for the PCM were higher than those for the CM (G-) in the spatial frequency domain over 2.5 cycles/mm. These results showed that the number of scattered X-rays was reduced sufficiently by the air gap in the PCM and the NEQ and DQE for PCM were influenced by the presampled MTF in the high-spatial-frequency domain.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 March 2010
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7622, Medical Imaging 2010: Physics of Medical Imaging, 762247 (23 March 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.843771
Show Author Affiliations
Yuri Kato, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
Naotoshi Fujita, Nagoya Univ. Hospital (Japan)
Yoshie Kodera, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7622:
Medical Imaging 2010: Physics of Medical Imaging
Ehsan Samei; Norbert J. Pelc, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top