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Proceedings Paper

Effect of accommodation training by stereoscopic movie presentation on myopic youth
Author(s): A. Sugiura; H. Takada; T. Yamamoto; M. Miyao
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Paper Abstract

The abnormal contraction of ciliary muscles due to the performance of a near visual task for several hours causes various vision problems such as asthenopia and visual loss. However, these problems can be resolved by activating the muscles by alternately repeating negative and positive accommodation. In this study, we have verified the effect of accommodation training that uses the strategy of presenting a stereoscopic movie to myopic youth and measuring the uncorrected distant visual acuity, spherical diopter (SPH), and subjective index of asthenopia obtained using a visual analog scale (VAS). Stereoscopic movies are prepared by using the POWER 3D method (Olympus Visual Communications Co., Ltd.), which reduces the inconsistency between the experienced and the actual senses. Thirty two myopic students aged 20 ± 1 years (16 males and 16 females) were chosen as the subjects. One group performed the accommodation training for 6 min, and the other group underwent a near visual task during the same period as the control group. We concluded the following from each item of verification: (a) The accommodation training using a stereoscopic movie had temporarily improved visual acuity. (b) This training led to a decrease in asthenopia. (c) The training improved the near-point accommodation function.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 February 2010
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7524, Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXI, 75241H (17 February 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.840065
Show Author Affiliations
A. Sugiura, Gifu Univ. of Medical Science (Japan)
H. Takada, Gifu Univ. of Medical Science (Japan)
T. Yamamoto, Gifu Univ. of Medical Science (Japan)
M. Miyao, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7524:
Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXI
Andrew J. Woods; Nicolas S. Holliman; Neil A. Dodgson, Editor(s)

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