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Proceedings Paper

Spinoptics: spin symmetry breaking in plasmonic nanostructures
Author(s): Erez Hasman; Yuri Gorodetski; Nir Shitrit; Itay Bretner; Avi Niv; Vladimir Kleiner
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Paper Abstract

The spin-Hall effect - the influence of the intrinsic spin on the electron trajectory, which produces transverse deflection of the electrons, is a central tenet in the field of spintronics. Apparently, the handedness of the light's polarization (optical spin up/down) may provide an additional degree of freedom in nanoscale photonics. The direct observation of optical spin-Hall effect that appears when a wave carrying spin angular momentum interacts with plasmonic nanostructures is presented. The measurements verify the unified geometric phase, demonstrated by the observed spin-dependent deflection of the surface waves as well as spin-dependent enhanced transmission through coaxial nanoapertures even in rotationally symmetric structures. Moreover, spin-orbit interaction is demonstrated by use of inhomogeneous and anisotropic subwavelength dielectric structures. The observed effects inspire one to investigate other spin-based plasmonic effects and to propose a new generation of optical elements for nanophotonic applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 September 2009
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7394, Plasmonics: Metallic Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties VII, 73941W (3 September 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.828941
Show Author Affiliations
Erez Hasman, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Yuri Gorodetski, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Nir Shitrit, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Itay Bretner, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Avi Niv, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Vladimir Kleiner, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7394:
Plasmonics: Metallic Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties VII
Mark I. Stockman, Editor(s)

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