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Proceedings Paper

Gamma-radiation-induced photodarkening in actively pumped Yb3+-doped optical fiber and investigation of post-irradiation transmittance recovery
Author(s): B. P. Fox; K. Simmons-Potter; S. W. Moore; J. H. Fisher; D. C. Meister
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Paper Abstract

Fibers doped with rare-earth constituents such as Yb3+ and Er3+, as well as fibers co-doped with these species, form an essential part of many optical systems requiring amplification. This study consists of two separate investigations examining the effects of gamma-radiation-induced photodarkening on the behavior of rare-earth doped fibers. In one part of this study, a suite of previously irradiated rare-earth doped fibers was heated to an elevated temperature of 300°C and the transmittance monitored over an 8-hour period. Transmittance recoveries of ~10 - 20% were found for Er 3+- doped fiber, while recoveries of ~5 - 15% and ~20% were found for Yb3+- and Yb3+/Er3+ co-doped fibers, respectively. In the other part of this study, an Yb3+-doped fiber was actively pumped by a laser diode during a gamma-radiation exposure to simulate the operation of an optical amplifier in a radiation environment. The response of the amplified signal was observed and monitored over time. A significant decrease in amplifier output was observed to result from the gamma-radiation exposure.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 August 2009
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7434, Optical Technologies for Arming, Safing, Fuzing, and Firing V, 74340C (29 August 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.828382
Show Author Affiliations
B. P. Fox, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
K. Simmons-Potter, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
S. W. Moore, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
J. H. Fisher, GH Systems (United States)
D. C. Meister, Sandia National Labs. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7434:
Optical Technologies for Arming, Safing, Fuzing, and Firing V
Fred M. Dickey; Richard A. Beyer, Editor(s)

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