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Proceedings Paper

Nanodetection of the disinfection by-products on GC-MS techniques
Author(s): Dumitru Ristoiu; Melinda Haydee; Tania Ristoiu
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Paper Abstract

Exposures to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in residential drinking water occur through multiple routes and vary across the population because of differences in the amount and ways people use water. Municipal water in the Romania is disinfected, with chlorine being the most common disinfectant agent. Disinfection of water, in additional to having the benefit of destroying microbes that can transmit diseases, has the drawback of producing a series of compounds known as disinfection by-products (DBPs). Chlorination produces many compounds containing chlorine and/or bromine, some of which have been shown to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, and/or teratogenic in animal studies. The most abundant class of DBPs that result from chlorination of drinking water are trihalomethanes (THMs) - chloroform (CHCl3), dichlorobromomethane (CHCl2Br), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) and bromoform (CHBr3). The most predominant THM species was CHCl3 and it highest concentration was 85∙106 ng/m3. The others THMs compounds concentration were lower, between 65∙104 ng/m3 and 12∙106 ng/m3. THMs compounds were analyzed on gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS) and head space technique (HS) was used for all analysis.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 January 2009
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 7297, Advanced Topics in Optoelectronics, Microelectronics, and Nanotechnologies IV, 729729 (7 January 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.823693
Show Author Affiliations
Dumitru Ristoiu, Babes-Bolyai Univ. (Romania)
Melinda Haydee, Babes-Bolyai Univ. (Romania)
Tania Ristoiu, Technical Univ. of Cluj-Napoca (Romania)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7297:
Advanced Topics in Optoelectronics, Microelectronics, and Nanotechnologies IV
Paul Schiopu; Cornel Panait; George Caruntu; Adrian Manea, Editor(s)

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