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Proceedings Paper

Attosecond and femtosecond metrology for plasma mirrors
Author(s): F. Quéré; H. George; Ph. Martin
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Paper Abstract

When an intense ultrashort laser pulse impinges on an initially-solid target, it creates a dense plasma at the surface, which reflects a large fraction of the incident light. At high enough intensities, high-order harmonics of the incident laser frequency, associated in the time domain to trains of attosecond pulses, are generated in the light beam specularly reflected by this "plasma mirror". The mechanisms leading to this generation are now relatively well-established, and the first experimental evidence for attosecond pulses generated on plasma mirrors has recently been reported. An accurate characterization of the temporal structure of the light reflected by plasma mirrors, down to the attosecond scale, however remains an experimental challenge. In this paper, we describe three different methods that could be used for such temporal measurements, from the femtosecond to the attosecond time scale. Two of them are interferometric techniques which only require measurements of photons, while the third one is a new configuration of a now well-established method, developed for attosecond pulses generated in gases, and based on photoelectron spectroscopy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 May 2009
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 7359, Harnessing Relativistic Plasma Waves as Novel Radiation Sources from Terahertz to X-Rays and Beyond, 73590E (7 May 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.822010
Show Author Affiliations
F. Quéré, CEA, IRAMIS, Service des Photons Atomes et Molécules (France)
H. George, CEA, IRAMIS, Service des Photons Atomes et Molécules (France)
Ph. Martin, CEA, IRAMIS, Service des Photons Atomes et Molécules (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7359:
Harnessing Relativistic Plasma Waves as Novel Radiation Sources from Terahertz to X-Rays and Beyond
Dino A. Jaroszynski; Antoine Rousse, Editor(s)

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