Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Temporally resolved infrared spectra from the detonation of advanced munitions
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

A suite of instruments including a 100 kHz 4-channel radiometer, a rapid scanning Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, and two high-speed visible imagers was used to observe the detonation of several novel insensitive munitions being developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory. The spectral signatures exhibited from several different explosive compositions are discernable and may be exploited for event classification. The spectra are initially optically thick, resembling a Planckian distribution. In time, selective emission in the wings of atmospheric absorption bands becomes apparent, and the timescale and degree to which this occurs is correlated with aluminum content in the explosive formulation. By analyzing the high-speed imagery in conjunction with the time-resolved spectral measurements, it may be possible to interpret these results in terms of soot production and oxidation rates. These variables allow for an investigation into the chemical kinetics of explosions and perhaps reveal other phenomenology not yet readily apparent. With an increased phenomenological understanding, a model could be created to explain the kinetic behavior of the temperature and by-product concentration profiles and thus improve the ability of military sensing platforms to identify explosive types and sources.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 May 2009
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7330, Sensors and Systems for Space Applications III, 733006 (6 May 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.818166
Show Author Affiliations
Joe Motos Gordon, Air Force Institute of Technology (United States)
Kevin C. Gross, Air Force Institute of Technology (United States)
Glen P. Perram, Air Force Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7330:
Sensors and Systems for Space Applications III
Joseph L. Cox; Pejmun Motaghedi, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top