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Proceedings Paper

The semantic problem of science and its implications
Author(s): John E. Gray; Harold Szu
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Paper Abstract

Perception is the apparatus of many of the potential new sciences of the twenty-first century. We can imagine science as a symbolic language where there are concrete words which are taken from measurements while abstract words are defined by theory to construct new ways to think about more fuzzy concepts that occur in more human observation based sciences. By considering both semantics and meaning as part of establishing a theory we go beyond where syntax of mathematics has led us to in science. Thus, we argue that extending Shannon's model of communication to the semantic problem of communication is the problem of twenty-first century science and mathematics.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 March 2009
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 7343, Independent Component Analyses, Wavelets, Neural Networks, Biosystems, and Nanoengineering VII, 73430D (19 March 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.818156
Show Author Affiliations
John E. Gray, Naval Surface Warfare Ctr. (United States)
Harold Szu, Army NVSED (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7343:
Independent Component Analyses, Wavelets, Neural Networks, Biosystems, and Nanoengineering VII
Harold H. Szu; F. Jack Agee, Editor(s)

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