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Proceedings Paper

A bistable mechanism for chord extension morphing rotors
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Paper Abstract

Research efforts have shown that helicopter rotor blade morphing is an effective means to improve flight performance. Previous example of rotor blade morphing include using smart-materials for trailing deflection and rotor blade twist and tip twist, the development of a comfortable airfoil using compliant mechanisms, the use of a Gurney flap for air-flow deflection and centrifugal force actuated device to increase the span of the blade. In this paper we explore the use of a bistable mechanism for rotor morphing, specifically, blade chord extension using a bistable arc. Increasing the chord of the rotor blade is expected to generate more lift-load and improve helicopter performance. Bistable or "snap through" mechanisms have multiple stable equilibrium states and are a novel way to achieve large actuation output stroke. Bistable mechanisms do not require energy input to maintain a stable equilibrium state as both states do not require locking. In this work, we introduce a methodology for the design of bistable arcs for chord morphing using the finite element analysis and pseudo-rigid body model, to study the effect of different arc types, applied loads and rigidity on arc performance.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 April 2009
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7288, Active and Passive Smart Structures and Integrated Systems 2009, 72881C (6 April 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.815472
Show Author Affiliations
Terrence Johnson, Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
Mary Frecker, Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
Farhan Gandhi, Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7288:
Active and Passive Smart Structures and Integrated Systems 2009
Mehdi Ahmadian; Mehrdad N. Ghasemi-Nejhad, Editor(s)

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