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Proceedings Paper

Development of materials and processes for negative tone development toward 32-nm node 193-nm immersion double-patterning process
Author(s): Shinji Tarutani; Tsubaki Hideaki; Sou Kamimura
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Paper Abstract

A new negative tone imaging with application of new developer to conventional ArF immersion resist materials is proposed to form narrow trench and contact hole patterns, which is promising for double patterning process, since it is difficult to obtain sufficient optical image contrast to print narrow trench or contact hole below 60 nm pattern size with positive tone imaging. No swelling property in the developing step realized low LWR number at 32 nm trench patterns. Uniform de-protection ratio through the depth of resist film reduced cuspy resist pattern profile causing micro-bridges at narrow trench pattern, and low frequency LWR number down to 2.4 nm. High resolution potential was demonstrated with 38 nm dense S/L under 1.35 NA immersion exposure. Better CD uniformity and LWR number of trench pattern were obtained by negative tone development (NTD) process with comparison to positive tone development (PTD) process. Excellent defect density of 0.02 counts/cm2 was obtained for 75 nm 1:1 S/L by combination of 0.75 NA dry exposure and NTD process combination. NTD process parameters impacts to defectivity were studied.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 2009
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7273, Advances in Resist Materials and Processing Technology XXVI, 72730C (1 April 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.814093
Show Author Affiliations
Shinji Tarutani, FUJIFILM Corp. (Japan)
Tsubaki Hideaki, FUJIFILM Corp. (Japan)
Sou Kamimura, FUJIFILM Corp. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7273:
Advances in Resist Materials and Processing Technology XXVI
Clifford L. Henderson, Editor(s)

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