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Proceedings Paper

Intercity commute patterns in central Texas
Author(s): F. Benjamin Zhan; Xuwei Chen
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Paper Abstract

There are highly populated regional corridors that connect multiple cities in different parts of the world. Public transportation is believed to be a good solution to ease traffic congestions in these corridors. To make informed decisions about public transportation planning, we must have a clear picture about commuting patterns in a corridor. Although the study of commute patterns has a long tradition in urban planning, urban geography, and transportation analysis, the examination of intercity commute patterns in urban corridors consisting of multiple cities has received limited attention. This study aims to achieve a better understanding of intercity commute patterns and flows in a five-county study area in Central Texas. We used GIS methods and network analysis procedures to analyze the U.S. 2000 Census Transportation Planning Package (CTPP) Part 3 Journey-to-Work data. Results from the analyses suggest that: (1) most (greater than 97%) of the workers with their homes in the five-county area also worked in the area; (2) the number of people who worked in the five-county area exceeded the number of people who had their homes in the area; and (3) most of the intercity commuting trips were between cities located within the same metropolitan area.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 November 2008
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7144, Geoinformatics 2008 and Joint Conference on GIS and Built Environment: The Built Environment and Its Dynamics, 71442N (5 November 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.812844
Show Author Affiliations
F. Benjamin Zhan, Texas State Univ., San Marcos (United States)
Xuwei Chen, Northern Illinois Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7144:
Geoinformatics 2008 and Joint Conference on GIS and Built Environment: The Built Environment and Its Dynamics

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