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Proceedings Paper

Hyperpolarized 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging of a rat model of transient ischemic stroke
Author(s): Ronn P. Walvick; Birgul Bastan; Austin Reno; Joey Mansour; Yanping Sun; Xin Zhou; Mary Mazzanti; Marc Fisher; Christopher H. Sotak; Mitchell S. Albert
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Paper Abstract

Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of all stroke cases. Although proton diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the gold standards in ischemic stroke diagnostics, the use of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI has a potential role to contribute to the diagnostic picture. The highly lipophilic hyperpolarized 129Xe can be non-invasively delivered via inhalation into the lungs where it is dissolved into the blood and delivered to other organs such as the brain. As such, we expect hyperpolarized 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer which will result in a signal deficit in areas of blood deprived tissue. In this work, we present imaging results from an animal model of transient ischemic stroke characterized through 129Xe MRI. In this model, a suture is used to occlude the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the rat brain, thus causing an ischemic event. After a period of MCA occlusion, the suture can then be removed to reperfuse the ischemic area. During the ischemic phase of the stroke, a signal void was observed in the MCA territory; which was subsequently restored by normal 129Xe MRI signal once perfusion was reinstated. Further, a higher resolution one-dimensional chemical shift image shows a sharp signal drop in the area of ischemia. Validation of ischemic damage was shown through both proton diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC) staining. The results show the potential of 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer; information that may add to the diagnostic and prognostic utility of the clinical picture of stroke.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 February 2009
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7262, Medical Imaging 2009: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging, 726209 (27 February 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.812344
Show Author Affiliations
Ronn P. Walvick, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (United States)
Birgul Bastan, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Austin Reno, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Joey Mansour, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Yanping Sun, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Xin Zhou, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Mary Mazzanti, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Marc Fisher, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Christopher H. Sotak, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (United States)
Mitchell S. Albert, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7262:
Medical Imaging 2009: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging
Xiaoping P. Hu; Anne V. Clough, Editor(s)

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