Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Evaluation of chest tomosynthesis for the detection of pulmonary nodules: effect of clinical experience and comparison with chest radiography
Author(s): Sara Zachrisson; Jenny Vikgren; Angelica Svalkvist; Åse A. Johnsson; Marianne Boijsen; Agneta Flinck; Lars Gunnar Månsson; Susanne Kheddache; Magnus Båth
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Chest tomosynthesis refers to the technique of collecting low-dose projections of the chest at different angles and using these projections to reconstruct section images of the chest. In this study, a comparison of chest tomosynthesis and chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary nodules was performed and the effect of clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis was evaluated. Three senior thoracic radiologists, with more than ten years of experience of chest radiology and 6 months of clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis, acted as observers in a jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristics (JAFROC-1) study, performed on 42 patients with and 47 patients without pulmonary nodules examined with both chest tomosynthesis and chest radiography. MDCT was used as reference and the total number of nodules found using MDCT was 131. To investigate the effect of additional clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis, a second reading session of the tomosynthesis images was performed one year after the initial one. The JAFROC-1 figure of merit (FOM) was used as the principal measure of detectability. In comparison with chest radiography, chest tomosynthesis performed significantly better with regard to detectability. The observer-averaged JAFROC-1 FOM was 0.61 for tomosynthesis and 0.40 for radiography, giving a statistically significant difference between the techniques of 0.21 (p<0.0001). The observer-averaged JAFROC-1 FOM of the second reading of the tomosynthesis cases was not significantly higher than that of the first reading, indicating no improvement in detectability due to additional clinical experience of tomosynthesis.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 March 2009
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 7263, Medical Imaging 2009: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment, 72630Z (12 March 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.811099
Show Author Affiliations
Sara Zachrisson, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Jenny Vikgren, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Angelica Svalkvist, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Åse A. Johnsson, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Marianne Boijsen, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Agneta Flinck, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Lars Gunnar Månsson, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Susanne Kheddache, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)
Magnus Båth, Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden)
Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (Sweden)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7263:
Medical Imaging 2009: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment
Berkman Sahiner; David J. Manning, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top