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Proceedings Paper

Iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment
Author(s): S. M. Cassim; A. J. Giustini; A. A. Petryk; R. A. Strawbridge; P. J. Hoopes
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Paper Abstract

It is established that heat can enhance the effect of radiation cancer treatment. Due to the ability to localize thermal energy using nanoparticle hyperthermia, as opposed to other, less targeted, hyperthermia modalities, it appears such enhancement could be accomplished without complications normally associated with systemic or regional hyperthermia. This study employs non-curative (suboptimal), doses of heat and radiation, in an effort to determine the therapeutic enhancement potential for IONP hyperthermia and radiation. Methods: MTG-B murine breast adenocarcinoma cell are inoculated into the right flanks of female CH3/HEJ mice and grown to volumes of 150mm3+ /- 40 mm3. A single dose of 15 Gy (6 MeV) radiation was uniformly delivered to the tumor. A pre-defined thermal dose is delivered by direct injection of iron oxide nanoparticles into the tumor. By adjusting the field strength of the 160 KHz alternating magnetic field (AMF) an intra-tumoral temperature between 41.5 and 43 degrees Celsius was maintained for 10min. The alternating magnetic field was delivered by a water-cooled 36mm diameter square copper tube induction coil operating at 160 kHz with variable magnet field strengths up to 450 Oe . The primary endpoint of the study is the number of days required for the tumor to achieve a volume 3 fold greater than the volume at the time of treatment (tumor regrowth delay). Results: Preliminary results suggest the addition of a modest IONP hyperthermia to 15 Gy radiation achieved an approximate 50% increase in tumor regrowth delay as compared to a 15 Gy radiation treatment alone. The therapeutic effects of IONP heat and radiation combined were considered additive, however in mice that demonstrated complete response (no tumor present after 30 days), the effect was considered superadditive or synergistic. Although this data is very encouraging from a multimodality cancer therapy standpoint, additional temporal and dose related information is clearly necessary to optimize the therapy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 February 2009
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7181, Energy-based Treatment of Tissue and Assessment V, 71810O (23 February 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.810035
Show Author Affiliations
S. M. Cassim, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Ctr., Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Dartmouth College (United States)
A. J. Giustini, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Ctr., Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Dartmouth College (United States)
A. A. Petryk, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Ctr., Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Dartmouth College (United States)
R. A. Strawbridge, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Ctr., Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Dartmouth College (United States)
P. J. Hoopes, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Ctr., Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Dartmouth College (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7181:
Energy-based Treatment of Tissue and Assessment V
Thomas P. Ryan, Editor(s)

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