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Proceedings Paper

Monitoring blood flow and photobleaching during topical ALA PDT treatment
Author(s): Theresa L. Sands; Ulas Sunar; Thomas H. Foster; Allan R. Oseroff
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Paper Abstract

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using topical aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is currently used as a clinical treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers. In order to optimize PDT treatment, vascular shutdown early in treatment must be identified and prevented. This is especially important for topical ALA PDT where vascular shutdown is only temporary and is not a primary method of cell death. Shutdown in vasculature would limit the delivery of oxygen which is necessary for effective PDT treatment. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) was used to monitor relative blood flow changes in Balb/C mice undergoing PDT at fluence rates of 10mW/cm2 and 75mW/cm2 for colon-26 tumors implanted intradermally. DCS is a preferable method to monitor the blood flow during PDT of lesions due to its ability to be used noninvasively throughout treatment, returning data from differing depths of tissue. Photobleaching of the photosensitizer was also monitored during treatment as an indirect manner of monitoring singlet oxygen production. In this paper, we show the conditions that cause vascular shutdown in our tumor model and its effects on the photobleaching rate.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 February 2009
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7164, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVIII, 71640U (18 February 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.809217
Show Author Affiliations
Theresa L. Sands, Roswell Park Cancer Institute (United States)
Ulas Sunar, Roswell Park Cancer Institute (United States)
Thomas H. Foster, Univ. of Rochester Medical Ctr. (United States)
Allan R. Oseroff, Roswell Park Cancer Institute (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7164:
Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVIII
David H. Kessel, Editor(s)

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