Share Email Print

Proceedings Paper

Wide range force feedback for catheter insertion mechanism for use in minimally invasive mitral valve repair surgery
Author(s): Roozbeh Ahmadi; Saeed Sokhanvar; Muthukumaran Packirisamy; Javad Dargahi
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is a condition in which heart's mitral valve does not close tightly, which allows blood to leak back into the left atrium. Restoring the dimension of the mitral-valve annulus by percutaneous intervention surgery is a common choice to treat MR. Currently, this kind of open heart annuloplasty surgery is being performed through sternotomy with cardiomyopathy bypass. In order to reduce trauma to the patient and also to eliminate bypass surgery, robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedure, which requires small keyhole incisions, has a great potential. To perform this surgery through MIS procedure, an accurate computer controlled catheter with wide-range force feedback capabilities is required. There are three types of tissues at the site of operation: mitral leaflet, mitral annulus and left atrium. The maximum allowable applied force to these three types of tissue is totally different. For instance, leaflet tissue is the most sensitive one with the lowest allowable force capacity. For this application, therefore, a wide-range force sensing is highly required. Most of the sensors that have been developed for use in MIS applications have a limited range of sensing. Therefore, they need to be calibrated for different types of tissue. The present work, reports on the design, modeling and simulation of a novel wide-range optical force sensor for measurement of contact pressure between catheter tip and heart tissue. The proposed sensor offers a wide input range with a high resolution and sensitivity over this range. Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology, this sensor can be microfabricated and integrated with commercially available catheters.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2009
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7173, Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications IX, 71730W (21 February 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.808308
Show Author Affiliations
Roozbeh Ahmadi, Concordia Univ. (Canada)
Saeed Sokhanvar, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Muthukumaran Packirisamy, Concordia Univ. (Canada)
Javad Dargahi, Concordia Univ. (Canada)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7173:
Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications IX
Israel Gannot, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top