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Proceedings Paper

Optical design considerations when imaging the fundus with an adaptive optics correction
Author(s): Weiwei Wang; Melanie C. W. Campbell; Marsha L. Kisilak; Shelley R. Boyd
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Paper Abstract

Adaptive Optics (AO) technology has been used in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (CSLO) which are analogous to confocal scanning laser microscopes (CSLM) with advantages of real-time imaging, increased image contrast, a resistance to image degradation by scattered light, and improved optical sectioning. With AO, the instrumenteye system can have low enough aberrations for the optical quality to be limited primarily by diffraction. Diffraction-limited, high resolution imaging would be beneficial in the understanding and early detection of eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. However, to maintain diffraction-limited imaging, sufficient pixel sampling over the field of view is required, resulting in the need for increased data acquisition rates for larger fields. Imaging over smaller fields may be a disadvantage with clinical subjects because of fixation instability and the need to examine larger areas of the retina. Reduction in field size also reduces the amount of light sampled per pixel, increasing photon noise. For these reasons, we considered an instrument design with a larger field of view. When choosing scanners to be used in an AOCSLO, the ideal frame rate should be above the flicker fusion rate for the human observer and would also allow user control of targets projected onto the retina. In our AOCSLO design, we have studied the tradeoffs between field size, frame rate and factors affecting resolution. We will outline optical approaches to overcome some of these tradeoffs and still allow detection of the earliest changes in the fundus in diabetic retinopathy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 August 2008
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 7099, Photonics North 2008, 70990C (12 August 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.807121
Show Author Affiliations
Weiwei Wang, Univ. of Waterloo (Canada)
Melanie C. W. Campbell, Univ. of Waterloo (Canada)
Marsha L. Kisilak, Univ. of Waterloo (Canada)
Shelley R. Boyd, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7099:
Photonics North 2008

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