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Proceedings Paper

The study on the friction pressure drop rate of moist air transferring in pipes
Author(s): Weijun Zhang; Xiaofeng Meng; Shaobo Bai
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Paper Abstract

In order to analyze the rate of pressure drop of moist air in pipes, a new mathematical model of the friction pressure drop rate (FPDR) of slow transferring air was submitted in this paper. The parameters of the model are including air's characters of velocity, temperature, pressure, percentage of maximal relative humidity, and pipe's physical characters of length, diameter, equivalent roughness, the influences of which to the FPDR are analyzed and validated by simulations based on the model. We present the varying trends of FPDR, and the derivations of the maximal FPDR in laminar flow region and in onflow region. Then we have drawn a conclusion that the maximal FPDR lies in laminar flow region if there are both onflow region and laminar flow region. This study educes the measures to calculate the value of FPDR, and sums up the methods of reducing FPDR. This research may deliver references to optimize designs of liquid transferring in pipes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 October 2008
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 7127, Seventh International Symposium on Instrumentation and Control Technology: Sensors and Instruments, Computer Simulation, and Artificial Intelligence, 71272O (13 October 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.806834
Show Author Affiliations
Weijun Zhang, Beijing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (China)
Xiaofeng Meng, Beijing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (China)
Shaobo Bai, Beijing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7127:
Seventh International Symposium on Instrumentation and Control Technology: Sensors and Instruments, Computer Simulation, and Artificial Intelligence

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