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Proceedings Paper

353 nm high fluence irradiation of fused silica
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Paper Abstract

Fused Silica is one of the key materials for 193 nm and 248 nm lithography as well as Laser Fusion experiments (355nm windows) and is used for laser optics, beam delivery system optics and stepper/scanner optics for different wavelengths including excimer laser wavelengths 193 nm / 248 nm / 353nm. Rising energy densities per pulse and higher repetition rates will lead to decreasing exposure times in the future. The radiation induced defect generation of Lithosil® at wavelength 248 nm and 193 nm is well described [1,2]. The lifetime of Fused Silica at high fluence irradiation at 193 nm and 248 nm is limited by compaction and microchannel generation [3]. Short time tests well established for characterization of laser radiation induced defect generation in Lithosil® at irradiation wavelengths 193 nm and 248 nm were transferred to 353 nm laser irradiation experiments. Within these short time tests initial and radiation induced absorption as well as the measurement of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) are adequate methods to characterize the material under laser irradiation. Transmission and LIF measurements before and after high energy irradiation were performed to reveal the applicability of different grades of Lithosil® for 353 nm laser applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 December 2008
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7132, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2008, 71321Q (30 December 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.804474
Show Author Affiliations
Alfons Burkert, Institute of Photonic Technology (Germany)
Ute Natura, SCHOTT AG (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7132:
Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2008
Gregory J. Exarhos; Detlev Ristau; M. J. Soileau; Christopher J. Stolz, Editor(s)

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