Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Tackling field-portable Raman spectroscopy of real world samples
Author(s): Neil C. Shand
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

A major challenge confronting first responders, customs authorities and other security-related organisations is the accurate, rapid, and safe identification of potentially hazardous chemicals outside a laboratory environment. Currently, a range of hand portable Raman equipment is commercially available that is low cost and increasingly more sophisticated. These systems are generally based on the 785nm Stokes shifted Raman technique with many using dispersive grating spectrometers. This technique offers a broad range of capabilities including the ability to analyse illicit drugs, explosives, chemical weapons and pre-cursors but still has some fundamental constraints. 'Real world' samples, such as those found at a crime scene, will often not be presented in the most accessible manner. Simple issues such as glass fluorescence can make an otherwise tractable sample impossible to analyse in-situ. A new generation of portable Raman equipment is currently being developed to address these issues. Consideration is given to the use of longer wavelength for fluorescence reduction. Alternative optical designs are being tested to compensate for the signal reduction incurred by moving to longer wavelengths. Furthermore, the use of anti-Stokes spectroscopy is being considered as well as investigating the robustness and portability of traditional Fourier Transform interferometer designs along with future advances in detector technology and ultra small spectrometers.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 October 2008
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7119, Optics and Photonics for Counterterrorism and Crime Fighting IV, 71190J (7 October 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.802345
Show Author Affiliations
Neil C. Shand, Defence Science and Technology Lab. (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7119:
Optics and Photonics for Counterterrorism and Crime Fighting IV
Gari Owen, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top