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Proceedings Paper

Studying the potential of terahertz radiation for deriving ice cloud microphysical information
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Paper Abstract

With wavelengths in the order of the size of typical ice cloud particles and therefore being sensitive to ice clouds, the Terahertz (THz) region is expected to bear a high potential concerning measuring ice cloud properties, in particular microphysical parameters. In this paper we give an introduction to the characteristics of atmospheric THz radiation between 0-5THz (wavelengths >60 μm and wavenumber<170 cm-1 respectively) as well as ice cloud optical properties and cloud effects in the THz region. Using radiative transfer model simulations we analyze the sensitivity of THz spectra to ice content and particle size. For tropical cases cloud effects in the order of 0.1 K/(g/m2) are found. Assuming instrumental sensitivities of typically around 1K these effects allow for detection of clouds with columnar ice content of 10 g/m2. It is demonstrated that submillimeter (SMM) instruments are sensitive to particles with sizes larger than 100 μm, while THz observations potentially can measure particles as small as 10 μm.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 October 2008
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7107, Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere XIII, 710704 (13 October 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.800262
Show Author Affiliations
Jana Mendrok, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (Japan)
Philippe Baron, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (Japan)
Yasuko Kasai, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7107:
Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere XIII
Richard H. Picard; Adolfo Comeron; Klaus Schäfer; Aldo Amodeo; Michiel van Weele, Editor(s)

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