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Proceedings Paper

Lidar measurements of temperature turbulence in the atmosphere
Author(s): Qiuhua Zheng; James Ryan; Paul Hays
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Paper Abstract

Optical turbulence is an important characteristic for laser propagation in the atmosphere. The optical turbulence causes refractive index fluctuations in the air. The accumulative atmospheric refractive index fluctuations can incur deleterious effects to a laser beam propagating in the atmosphere by distorting its wavefront. Accurate characterization of turbulence in the atmosphere is important to many light propagation studies and related applications. Temperature fluctuations/turbulences in the atmosphere are highly correlated with the atmospheric optical turbulence. In many occasions, optical turbulences profiles in the atmosphere were obtained through the measurements of temperature turbulence and other other atmospheric quantities, for example, air humidity. Therefore determination of temperature fluctuations/turbulences parameter is helpful to the measurement of optical turbulence. Thermosonde was commonly seen in measurements of C2T in the past. Here we show that a direct lidar system is able to fulfill the task of C2T measurements. And compared to the thermosonde measurements the proposed lidar method has many advantages.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 August 2008
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 7090, Atmospheric Optics: Models, Measurements, and Target-in-the-Loop Propagation II, 70900M (20 August 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.798148
Show Author Affiliations
Qiuhua Zheng, Michigan Aerospace Corp. (United States)
James Ryan, Univ. of New Hampshire (United States)
Paul Hays, Michigan Aerospace Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7090:
Atmospheric Optics: Models, Measurements, and Target-in-the-Loop Propagation II
Stephen M. Hammel; Alexander M. J. van Eijk; Mikhail A. Vorontsov, Editor(s)

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