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Proceedings Paper

Frequency selective bolometer development at Argonne National Laboratory
Author(s): Aaron Datesman; John Pearson; Gensheng Wang; Volodymyr Yefremenko; Ralu Divan; Thomas Downes; Clarence Chang; Jeff McMahon; Stephan Meyer; John Carlstrom; Daniel Logan; Thushara Perera; Grant Wilson; Valentyn Novosad
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Paper Abstract

We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory, of a four-pixel camera suitable for photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, and for study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in clusters, and galactic dust. Utilizing Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSBs) with superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs), each of the camera's four pixels is sensitive to four colors, with frequency bands centered approximately at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The current generation of these devices utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au or Ti/Au for TESs, along with frequency selective circuitry on membranes of silicon nitride 1 cm across and 1 micron thick. The operational properties of these devices are determined by this circuitry, along with thermal control structures etched into the membranes. These etched structures do not perforate the membrane, so that the device is both comparatively robust mechanically and carefully tailored in terms of its thermal transport properties. In this paper, we report on development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology and characterization of the FSB stacks. This includes the use of new materials, the design and testing of thermal control structures, the introduction of desirable thermal properties using buried layers of crystalline silicon underneath the membrane, detector stability control, and optical and thermal test results. The scientific motivation, FSB design, FSB fabrication, and measurement results are discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 July 2008
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 7020, Millimeter and Submillimeter Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy IV, 702029 (18 July 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.790034
Show Author Affiliations
Aaron Datesman, Argonne National Lab. (United States)
John Pearson, Argonne National Lab. (United States)
Gensheng Wang, Argonne National Lab. (United States)
Volodymyr Yefremenko, Argonne National Lab. (United States)
Ralu Divan, Argonne National Lab. (United States)
Thomas Downes, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Univ. of Chicago (United States)
Clarence Chang, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Univ. of Chicago (United States)
Jeff McMahon, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Univ. of Chicago (United States)
Stephan Meyer, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Univ. of Chicago (United States)
John Carlstrom, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Univ. of Chicago (United States)
Daniel Logan, Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)
Thushara Perera, Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)
Grant Wilson, Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)
Valentyn Novosad, Argonne National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7020:
Millimeter and Submillimeter Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy IV
William D. Duncan; Wayne S. Holland; Stafford Withington; Jonas Zmuidzinas, Editor(s)

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