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Proceedings Paper

The laser guide star program for the LBT
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Paper Abstract

Laser guide star adaptive optics and interferometry are currently revolutionizing ground-based near-IR astronomy, as demonstrated at various large telescopes. The Large Binocular Telescope from the beginning included adaptive optics in the telescope design. With the deformable secondary mirrors and a suite of instruments taking advantage of the AO capabilities, the LBT will play an important role in addressing major scientific questions. Extending from a natural guide star based system, towards a laser guide stars will multiply the number of targets that can be observed. In this paper we present the laser guide star and wavefront sensor program as currently being planned for the LBT. This program will provide a multi Rayleigh guide star constellation for wide field ground layer correction taking advantage of the multi object spectrograph and imager LUCIFER in a first step. The already foreseen upgrade path will deliver an on axis diffraction limited mode with LGS AO based on tomography or additional sodium guide stars to even further enhance the scientific use of the LBT including the interferometric capabilities.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 July 2008
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7015, Adaptive Optics Systems, 701515 (7 July 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.788173
Show Author Affiliations
S. Rabien, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
N. Ageorges, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
R. Angel, Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona (United States)
G. Brusa, Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (United States)
J. Brynnel, Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (United States)
L. Busoni, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy)
R. Davies, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
M. Deysenroth, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
S. Esposito, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy)
W. Gässler, Max Planck Institut für Astronomie (Germany)
R. Genzel, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
R. Green, Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (United States)
M. Haug, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
M. Lloyd Hart, Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona (United States)
G. Hölzl, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
E. Masciadri, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy)
R. Pogge, The Ohio State Univ. (United States)
A. Quirrenbach, Landessternwarte Heidelberg (Germany)
M. Rademacher, Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona (United States)
H. W. Rix, Max Planck Institut für Astronomie (Germany)
P. Salinari, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy)
C. Schwab, Landessternwarte Heidelberg (Germany)
T. Stalcup, Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona (United States)
J. Storm, Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam (Germany)
L. Strüder, Max Planck Institut Semiconductor Lab. (Germany)
M. Thiel, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
G. Weigelt, Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie (Germany)
J. Ziegleder, Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7015:
Adaptive Optics Systems
Norbert Hubin; Claire E. Max; Peter L. Wizinowich, Editor(s)

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