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Proceedings Paper

Gemini Planet Imager autonomous software
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Paper Abstract

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an "extreme" adaptive optics coronagraph system that will have the ability to directly detect and characterize young Jovian-mass exoplanets. The design of this instrument involves eight principal institutions geographically spread across North America, with four of those sites writing software that must run seamlessly together while maintaining autonomous behaviour. The objective of the software teams is to provide Gemini with a unified software system that not only performs well but also is easy to maintain. Issues such as autonomous behaviour in a unified environment, common memory to share status and information, examples of how this is being implemented, plans for early software integration and testing, command hierarchy, plans for common documentation and updates are explored in this paper. The project completed its preliminary design phase in 2007, and has just recently completed its critical design phase.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 July 2008
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7019, Advanced Software and Control for Astronomy II, 701910 (14 July 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.788032
Show Author Affiliations
Jennifer Dunn, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Robert Wooff, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Malcolm Smith, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Dan Kerley, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council Canada (Canada)
Dave Palmer, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Steve Jones, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Jason Weiss, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
John Angione, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
James R. Graham, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7019:
Advanced Software and Control for Astronomy II
Alan Bridger; Nicole M. Radziwill, Editor(s)

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