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Proceedings Paper

Solvent-cast PCL films support the regeneration of NG108-15 nerve cells
Author(s): Mingzhu Sun; Sandra Downes
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Paper Abstract

The reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects over a short distance (10-20mm) could benefit from the development of novel biomaterials. Bio-degradable and bio-compatible materials are being pursued to replace the currently used nerve autografts. We hypothesize that physical properties, particularly surface texture, could have substantial effects on the hydrophilicity of some synthetic polymers and subsequently the compatibility of them with cells. In this study, poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films have been cast using four solvents from different chemical families and evaluated for their suitability and potential use as a nerve conduit substratum. The following solvents: dichloromethane (DCM, Halocarbon), methyl acetate (MA, Ester), tetrahydrofuran (THF, Ether) and acetic acid (AA, organic acid) were used to produce PCL films. The physical properties of these PCL films, average surface roughness (Ra) and wettability were measured. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques were applied to obtain information on the surface texture. Motor neuron-like NG108-15 cells were used as a model to evaluate the biocompatibility of the films. It was found that same polymer when processed using different solvents could produce materials with markedly different physical and biochemical properties. Importantly, all PCL films were supportive for the growth and differentiation of NG108-15 cells.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 November 2007
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6423, International Conference on Smart Materials and Nanotechnology in Engineering, 64230E (1 November 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.779219
Show Author Affiliations
Mingzhu Sun, The Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)
Sandra Downes, The Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6423:
International Conference on Smart Materials and Nanotechnology in Engineering

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