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Proceedings Paper

Recent advances toward a fiber optic sensor for nerve agent
Author(s): Manal Beshay; Steven R. Cordero; Harold Mukamal; David Ruiz; Robert A. Lieberman
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Paper Abstract

We report advances made on the development of a fiber optic nerve agent sensor having its entire length as the sensing element. Upon exposure to sarin gas or its simulant, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, the cladding changes color resulting in an alteration of the light intensity throughput. The optical fiber is multimode and consists of a fused-silica core and a nerve agent sensitive cladding. The absorption characteristics of the cladding affect the fiber's spectral attenuation and limit the length of light guiding fiber that can be deployed continuously. The absorption of the cladding is also dependent on the sensor formulation, which in turn influences the sensitivity of the fiber. In this paper, data related to the trade-off of sensitivity, spectral attenuation, and length of fiber challenged will be reported. The fiber is mass produced using a conventional fiber optic draw tower. This technology could be used to protect human resources and buildings from dangerous chemical attacks, particularly when large areas or perimeters must be covered. It may also be used passively to determine how well such areas have been decontaminated.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 April 2008
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6954, Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing IX, 69540F (17 April 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.778117
Show Author Affiliations
Manal Beshay, Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. (United States)
Steven R. Cordero, Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. (United States)
Harold Mukamal, Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. (United States)
David Ruiz, Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. (United States)
Robert A. Lieberman, Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6954:
Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing IX
Augustus Way Fountain; Patrick J. Gardner, Editor(s)

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