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Proceedings Paper

Use of optical pharmacokinetics systems (OPS) for non-invasive measurement of Phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4) concentrations in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 xenografts
Author(s): Lihua Bai; Erin Joseph; Nancy L. Olenick; John M. Mulvihill; Denise K. Feyes; Julie L. Eiseman
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Paper Abstract

Objective: Pc 4, a phthalocyanine photosensitizer in Phase I photodynamic therapy (PDT) trials, requires laser activation near 672 nm. For effective PDT, photosensitizer must be present in the target tissues. OPS uses elastic scattering spectroscopy to measure Pc 4 optical absorption non-invasively, and that absorbance can be converted to concentration using Pc 4 standard curves in 1% Intralipid®. In this study, we used OPS to evaluate Pc 4 optical absorption with time in subcutaneous tumor (with or without laser activation) and in contralateral skin. Tumor response was also evaluated after Pc 4-PDT. Conclusions: Both Pc 4 and hemoglobin optical absorption could be monitored by OPS. The decrease of Pc 4 absorption after PDT and the appearance of d-hbg indicated that alterations occurred in the tumor following Pc 4-PDT. The increase in d-hbg suggests that oxygen was not replaced completely, possibly due to circulation damage in tumor.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 October 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6796, Photonics North 2007, 67960L (26 October 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.778081
Show Author Affiliations
Lihua Bai, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Erin Joseph, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Nancy L. Olenick, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
John M. Mulvihill, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Denise K. Feyes, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Julie L. Eiseman, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6796:
Photonics North 2007

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