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Proceedings Paper

Addressing security issues related to virtual institute distributed activities
Author(s): Martin R. Stytz; Sheila B. Banks
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Paper Abstract

One issue confounding the development and experimentation of distributed modeling and simulation environments is the inability of the project team to identify and collaborate with resources, both human and technical, from outside the United States. This limitation is especially significant within the human behavior representation area where areas such as cultural effects research and joint command team behavior modeling require the participation of various cultural and national representatives. To address this limitation, as well as other human behavior representation research issues, NATO Research and Technology Organization initiated a project to develop a NATO virtual institute that enables more effective and more collaborative research into human behavior representation. However, in building and operating a virtual institute one of the chief concerns must be the cyber security of the institute. Because the institute "exists" in cyberspace, all of its activities are susceptible to cyberattacks, subterfuge, denial of service and all of the vulnerabilities that networked computers must face. In our opinion, for the concept of virtual institutes to be successful and useful, their operations and services must be protected from the threats in the cyber environment. A key to developing the required protection is the development and promulgation of standards for cyber security. In this paper, we discuss the types of cyber standards that are required, how new internet technologies can be exploited and can benefit the promulgation, development, maintenance, and robustness of the standards. This paper is organized as follows. Section One introduces the concept of the virtual institutes, the expected benefits, and the motivation for our research and for research in this area. Section Two presents background material and a discussion of topics related to VIs, uman behavior and cultural modeling, and network-centric warfare. Section Three contains a discussion of the security challenges that face the virtual institute and the characteristics of the standards that must be employed. Section Four contains our proposal for documentation of the cybersecurity standards. Section Five contains the conclusion and suggestions for further work.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 March 2008
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 6973, Data Mining, Intrusion Detection, Information Assurance, and Data Networks Security 2008, 697303 (17 March 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.778006
Show Author Affiliations
Martin R. Stytz, Institute for Defense Analyses (United States)
Sheila B. Banks, Calculated Insight (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6973:
Data Mining, Intrusion Detection, Information Assurance, and Data Networks Security 2008
William J. Tolone; William Ribarsky, Editor(s)

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