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Proceedings Paper

Atmospheric invariants for hyperspectral image correction
Author(s): M. Bernhardt; W. Oxford
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Paper Abstract

The degrading effect of the atmosphere on hyperspectral imagery has long been recognised as a major issue in applying techniques such as spectrally-matched filters to hyperspectral data. There are a number of algorithms available in the literature for the correction of hyperspectral data. However most of these approaches rely either on identifying objects within a scene (e.g. water whose spectral characteristics are known) or by measuring the relative effects of certain absorption features and using this to construct a model of the atmosphere which can then be used to correct the image. In the work presented here, we propose an alternative approach which makes use of the fact that the effective number of degrees of freedom in the atmosphere (transmission, path radiance and downwelling radiance with respect to wavelength) is often substantially less than the number of degrees of freedom in the spectra of interest. This allows the definition of a fixed set of invariant features (which may be linear or non-linear) from which reflectance spectra can be approximately reconstructed irrespective of the particular atmosphere. The technique is demonstrated on a range of data across the visible to near infra-red, mid-wave and long-wave infra-red regions, where its performance is quantified.

Paper Details

Date Published: 11 April 2008
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6966, Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery XIV, 69661A (11 April 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.777060
Show Author Affiliations
M. Bernhardt, Waterfall Solutions Ltd. (United Kingdom)
W. Oxford, Waterfall Solutions Ltd. (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6966:
Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery XIV
Sylvia S. Shen; Paul E. Lewis, Editor(s)

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