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Proceedings Paper

Analysis of bat wings for morphing
Author(s): Emily A. Leylek; Justin E. Manzo; Ephrahim Garcia
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Paper Abstract

The morphing of wings from three different bat species is studied using an extension of the Weissinger method. To understand how camber affects performance factors such as lift and lift to drag ratio, XFOIL is used to study thin (3% thickness to chord ratio) airfoils at a low Reynolds number of 100,000. The maximum camber of 9% yielded the largest lift coefficient, and a mid-range camber of 7% yielded the largest lift to drag ratio. Correlations between bat wing morphology and flight characteristics are covered, and the three bat wing planforms chosen represent various combinations of morphological components and different flight modes. The wings are studied using the extended Weissinger method in an "unmorphed" configuration using a thin, symmetric airfoil across the span of the wing through angles of attack of 0°-15°. The wings are then run in the Weissinger method at angles of attack of -2° to 12° in a "morphed" configuration modeled after bat wings seen in flight, where the camber of the airfoils comprising the wings is varied along the span and a twist distribution along the span is introduced. The morphed wing configurations increase the lift coefficient over 1000% from the unmorphed configuration and increase the lift to drag ratio over 175%. The results of the three different species correlate well with their flight in nature.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 April 2008
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6928, Active and Passive Smart Structures and Integrated Systems 2008, 692825 (18 April 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.776387
Show Author Affiliations
Emily A. Leylek, Cornell Univ. (United States)
Justin E. Manzo, Cornell Univ. (United States)
Ephrahim Garcia, Cornell Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6928:
Active and Passive Smart Structures and Integrated Systems 2008
Mehdi Ahmadian, Editor(s)

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