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Proceedings Paper

Telescope divisibility limitations due to synchronization of array-based photon counting receivers in laser communications links
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Paper Abstract

Array-based architectures for deep-space photon counting lasercom links offer a powerful mechanism to lower the cost and improve the scalability of Earth- or space-based optical receivers. In this architecture, a large area receive telescope is constructed by using an array of small, inexpensive telescopes that are networked together. However, a limitation on how many small telescopes can be used comes from the minimum SNR requirement for synchronization. In general, the synchronization requirements are not difficult to meet for systems with enough SNR to achieve >Mbps performance. However, deep-space links often have large variations in their operational parameters due to varying link distances from orbital considerations as well as atmospherics. If the system is required to operate under such stressing conditions, albeit with a low (100's of Kbps) data rate, it is important to consider required SNR for synchronization as a design parameter. Furthermore, for very remote systems (e.g. beyond Mars), expected data rates may only be 100's of Kbps, in which case synchronization will be a critical design parameter. In this paper, we will examine the design trade space between number of arrayed telescopes and synchronization parameters. We will focus on the low SNR/ low data rate case as it is the most stressing.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 February 2008
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6877, Free-Space Laser Communication Technologies XX, 687708 (13 February 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.767245
Show Author Affiliations
F. I. Khatri, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)
G. Zogbi, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)
D. M. Boroson, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6877:
Free-Space Laser Communication Technologies XX
Steve Mecherle, Editor(s)

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