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Proceedings Paper

Progress in orientation-patterned GaAs for next-generation nonlinear optical devices
Author(s): Rita D. Peterson; David Bliss; Candace Lynch; David H. Tomich
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Paper Abstract

Orientation-patterned GaAs (OPGaAs) shows great promise as a nonlinear optical material for frequency conversion in the 2-5 μm and 8-12 μm regions. We report recent progress in each of the three main areas of OPGaAs development: fabrication of patterned templates using a combination of wafer bonding and MBE techniques; thick-layer HVPE growth; and material and OPO device characterization. This work has led to significant improvements in material quality, specifically reduced optical loss, increased sample thickness, improved patterned domain fidelity, and greater material uniformity. Advances in material quality have in turn enabled demonstration of OPO devices operating in the 3-5 μm spectral region. Optical loss and OPO performance measurements on a series of OPGaAs samples are presented, with the goal of understanding how these properties are influenced by growth conditions, and how OPO performance may be improved. Research continues on understanding loss mechanisms, correlating performance with material properties, transitioning the technology into an industrial process, and extending it to additional materials.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 February 2008
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6875, Nonlinear Frequency Generation and Conversion: Materials, Devices, and Applications VII, 68750D (13 February 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.766581
Show Author Affiliations
Rita D. Peterson, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
David Bliss, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Candace Lynch, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
David H. Tomich, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6875:
Nonlinear Frequency Generation and Conversion: Materials, Devices, and Applications VII
Peter E. Powers, Editor(s)

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