Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Effect of ionizing radiation on infrared polarizers based on conductive polymer
Author(s): R. R. Boye; C. M. Washburn; S. Samora; S. A. Kemme; D. R. Wheeler; D. L. Buller
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Conductive polymers have become an extremely useful class of materials for many optical applications. We have developed an electrochemical growth method for depositing highly conductive (~100 S/cm) polypyrrole. Additionally, we have adapted advanced fabrication methods for use with the polypyrrole resulting in gratings with submicron features. This conductive polymer micro-wire grid provides an optical polarizer with unique properties. When the polymer is exposed to ionizing radiation, its conductivity is affected and the polarization properties of the device, specifically the extinction ratio, change in a corresponding manner. This change in polarization properties can be determined by optically interrogating the device, possibly from a remote location. The result is a passive radiation-sensitive sensor with very low optical visibility. The ability to interrogate the device from a safe standoff distance provides a device useful in potentially dangerous environments. Also, the passive nature of the device make it applicable in applications where external power is not available. We will review the polymer deposition, fabrication methods and device design and modeling. The characterization of the polymer's sensitivity to ionizing radiation and optical testing of infrared polarizers before and after irradiation will also be presented. These experimental results will highlight the usefulness of the conductive infrared polarizer to many security and monitoring applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 February 2008
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6891, Organic Photonic Materials and Devices X, 68910U (12 February 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.763891
Show Author Affiliations
R. R. Boye, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
C. M. Washburn, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
S. Samora, L&M Technologies, Inc. (United States)
S. A. Kemme, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
D. R. Wheeler, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
D. L. Buller, Sandia National Labs. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6891:
Organic Photonic Materials and Devices X
Robert L. Nelson; Francois Kajzar; Toshikuni Kaino, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top