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Proceedings Paper

Combined nanoprobes for scanning probe microscopy: laser technology for processing and testing
Author(s): V. P. Veiko; A. O. Golubok; Z. Zuong; N. V. Varkentina; E. B. Yakovlev
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Paper Abstract

Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a high spatial resolution method of surface topography visualization and measurement of its local properties. The detecting of interaction arising between the sharp solid-state probe and the sample surface is the foundation of SPM. In dependence from nature of this interaction the scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM), etc. are distinguished. The spatial resolution of all types of probe microscopy determins both sharpness of increasing of interaction between a probe and a sample at their approach, and shape and size of a top of a solid-state probe. So, the progress in SPM information capabilities is highly depends from probe properties and first of all from properly fabricated aperture size. Fabrication procedures are rather complicated because of nanometric scale size of aperture and hard requirements to reproducibility and need to be improved. The way how to do it is involving of feed-back in a processing procedure-results in two types of feedback for the process of drawing-out has been suggested, tested and installed into the technological set-up. Different probes have been fabricated by laser-assisted drawing-out during this work: SNOM types from optical fibers, micropipettes from quartz glass capillaries, micropipettes with microwires inside and with metallic covers outside. Some examples of application of above mentioned combined probes for cell membrane technology are described. Most important from them are topographical studying of cells and bacteria in living condition (in liquid) and studying of the mechanical properties of cell (rigidity of cell membrane) using the nanopipette as a tip of a force sensor. Also measurement of ion current that runs through cell membrane during its metabolic process using the nanopipette as well as in the well-known patch-clamp method have been done.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 February 2008
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 6879, Photon Processing in Microelectronics and Photonics VII, 68791W (14 February 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.762939
Show Author Affiliations
V. P. Veiko, St. Petersburg State Univ. of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (Russia)
A. O. Golubok, St. Petersburg State Univ. of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (Russia)
Z. Zuong, St. Petersburg State Univ. of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (Russia)
N. V. Varkentina, St. Petersburg State Univ. of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (Russia)
E. B. Yakovlev, St. Petersburg State Univ. of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (Russia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6879:
Photon Processing in Microelectronics and Photonics VII
David B. Geohegan; Frank Träger; Jan J. Dubowski; Andrew S. Holmes; Michel Meunier; Craig B. Arnold; Hiroyuki Niino, Editor(s)

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