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Proceedings Paper

Effects of wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation on the noninvasive photoacoustic imaging of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in subcutaneous vasculature in vivo
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Paper Abstract

Due to wavelength-dependent optical attenuation in the skin, the local fluence at a subcutaneous vessel varies with the optical wavelength in a spectral measurement. Hence compensation for such a spectral attenuation is necessary in quantitative measurements of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (sO2) in blood vessels in vivo using photoacoustic (PA)imaging. Here, by employing a simplified double-layer skin model, we find that although the absolute value of sO2 in a vessel is seriously affected by the volume fraction of blood and the spatially averaged sO2 in the dermis, the difference of sO2 between neighboring vessels is minimally affected. Based on in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that the difference in sO2 between a typical artery and a typical vein is conserved before and after an experimentally acquired spectral compensation. This conservation holds regardless of the animal's systemic physiological state.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2008
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 6856, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2008: The Ninth Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics, 68561T (28 February 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.761984
Show Author Affiliations
Hao F. Zhang, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (United States)
Konstantin Maslov, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
Lihong V. Wang, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6856:
Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2008: The Ninth Conference on Biomedical Thermoacoustics, Optoacoustics, and Acousto-optics
Alexander A. Oraevsky; Lihong V. Wang, Editor(s)

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