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Proceedings Paper

A raster scanning reflectance imager for non-model based quantification of tissue scatter
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Paper Abstract

It has been shown that locally resolved reflectance measurements can directly quantify scatter changes in tissues without the need for computationally expensive model-based reconstruction schemes. Imaging systems exploiting non-model based reconstruction schemes are faster compared to the conventional model based schemes and thus have the potential for imaging tissue pathologies in real-time. In this report, the scanning system is described in terms of the design, construction and testing for multi-wavelength reflectance imaging capable of measuring scatter changes with 100 micron resolution of tissue. Imaging fields of up to 256 by 256 pixels were used in this current system, with a design for a 100 micron spot to allow sampling of the local scatter values in this size of region. Tissue phantoms with varying scattering and absorption profiles within the region of interest were used to test the performance of this system. The results demonstrate the ability of the instrument to measure scatter changes independent of local absorber concentration. This new scanning system should allow visualization of tumor-associated scatter changes in situ, with full spectral resolution across the visible range.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 February 2008
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6864, Biomedical Applications of Light Scattering II, 686402 (22 February 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.761780
Show Author Affiliations
Venkataramanan Krishnaswamy, Dartmouth College (United States)
P. Jack Hoopes, Dartmouth College (United States)
Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Kimberley S. Samkoe, Dartmouth College (United States)
Brian W. Pogue, Dartmouth College (United States)
Dartmouth Medical School (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6864:
Biomedical Applications of Light Scattering II
Adam Wax; Vadim Backman, Editor(s)

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