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Proceedings Paper

Design and fabrication process of a micropump using bulk Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 for microfluidic devices
Author(s): Ryohei Sakamoto; Van Thanh Dau; Dzung Viet Dao; Katsuhiko Tanaka; Susumu Sugiyama
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Paper Abstract

This paper reports on the design and simulation of a new valve-less pump for use in microfluidic applications. The simple-structure micropump comprises a piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) - Si diaphragm and flow channels which are fabricated using silicon micromachining techniques. The silicon diaphragm (5×5×0.05mm3) is driven by the PZT (45-μm thick) actuator that has quick response time and large driving force with low power consumption. A key technology to realize the pump diaphragm is the PZT-Si bonding process using a thin gold film as an intermediate layer. Under fabrication conditions of 550°C and 0.8 MPa, the strength of the bonding was experimentally validated to be 13 MPa. The maximum displacement of the diaphragm was measured to be 3 μm0-P with driving voltage of 30 Vp-p at resonance frequency of 10 kHz. Structural analysis of the diaphragm was done in terms of three-dimensional model using commercial software ANSYS. The flow channels are easily fabricated by silicon etching process. Design of flow channels focused on a cross junction formed by neck of the pump chamber, one outlet and two opposite inlet channels. This structure allows a difference in fluidic resistance and fluidic momentum to be created inside the channels during each pump vibration cycle. Two designs of the devices which have different channel depths, namely type A and type B, was investigated. Flow simulation was done by numerical transient model (using ANSYS-Fluent), in which only the measured deformation of the PZT diagram is applied and therefore no other assumptions are required. The results showed that the mass flow rate of the type A is 0.129×10-6 kg/s (mean flow rate of 6.3 ml/min) and that of type B is 1.65×10-6 kg/s (mean flow rate of 80.8 ml/min).

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 January 2008
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6800, Device and Process Technologies for Microelectronics, MEMS, Photonics, and Nanotechnology IV, 680022 (9 January 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.759548
Show Author Affiliations
Ryohei Sakamoto, Ritsumeikan Univ. (Japan)
Van Thanh Dau, Ritsumeikan Univ. (Japan)
Dzung Viet Dao, Ritsumeikan Univ. (Japan)
Katsuhiko Tanaka, Ritsumeikan Univ. (Japan)
Susumu Sugiyama, Ritsumeikan Univ. (Japan)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6800:
Device and Process Technologies for Microelectronics, MEMS, Photonics, and Nanotechnology IV
Hark Hoe Tan; Jung-Chih Chiao; Lorenzo Faraone; Chennupati Jagadish; Jim Williams; Alan R. Wilson, Editor(s)

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