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Proceedings Paper

HECOR: a HElium CORonagraphy aboard the Herschel sounding rocket
Author(s): Frédéric Auchère; Marie-Françoise Ravet-Krill; John D. Moses; Frédéric Rouesnel; Jean-Pierre Moalic; Denis Barbet; Christophe Hecquet; Arnaud Jérome; Raymond Mercier; Jean-Christophe Leclec'h; Franck Delmotte; Jeffrey S. Newmark
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Paper Abstract

HECOR (HElium CORonagraph) is a coronagraph designed to observe the solar corona at 30.4 nm between 1.2 and 4 solar radii. The instrument is part of the Herschel sounding rocket payload to be flown from White Sands Missile Range in December 2007. Much like for neutral hydrogen, the residual singly ionized helium present in the corona can be detected because it resonantly scatters the intense underlying chromospheric radiation. Combined with the simultaneous measurements of the neutral hydrogen corona made by SCORE, the other coronagraph of the Herschel payload, the HECOR observations will provide novel diagnostics of the solar wind outflow. HECOR is an externally occulted coronagraph of very simple design. It uses a triple-disc external occulting system, a single off axis multilayer coated mirror and a CCD camera. We present measurements of the EUV mirror roughness and reflectivity, tests of the image quality, and measurements of the stray light rejection performance. The mirror uses a novel multilayer design with three components that give HECOR a high throughput.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 October 2007
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 6689, Solar Physics and Space Weather Instrumentation II, 66890A (3 October 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.751447
Show Author Affiliations
Frédéric Auchère, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Marie-Françoise Ravet-Krill, Lab. Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
John D. Moses, Naval Reasearch Lab. (United States)
Frédéric Rouesnel, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Jean-Pierre Moalic, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Denis Barbet, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Christophe Hecquet, Lab. Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Arnaud Jérome, Lab. Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Raymond Mercier, Lab. Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Jean-Christophe Leclec'h, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Franck Delmotte, Lab. Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud (France)
Jeffrey S. Newmark, Naval Research Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6689:
Solar Physics and Space Weather Instrumentation II
Silvano Fineschi; Rodney A. Viereck, Editor(s)

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