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Proceedings Paper

Noninvasive measurement of glucose concentration using OCT based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle
Author(s): Xuefang Li; Youwu He; Zhifang Li; Hui Li
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Paper Abstract

We have developed a noninvasive method to monitor the glucose concentration in tissue phantom used the OCT model which based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel (EHF) principle. The changes of the optical properties such as the scattering coefficient μs, the anisotropy factor g and the effective scattering coefficient μs with the increase of the glucose concentration in 10% Intralipid solution were obtained. The results showed that the scattering coefficient μs decreased when the glucose concentration increased in the solution, which is accorded with the conclusions by others. Contrarily, the factor g increased when the glucose concentration grown up. As a result, the coefficient μs is fall with the increased of the glucose concentration. Comparing with those previously reported in which only got the relative value of scattering coefficient μs, the most important advantage of our model is that we got the practical value of μs, g and μs. All of these reveal that the OCT EHF model is a promising method which is adapted to detect the glucose concentration in solution, and it will be applied in medical fields someday.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 May 2007
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 6534, Fifth International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine, 65340E (1 May 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.741124
Show Author Affiliations
Xuefang Li, Fujian Normal Univ. (China)
Youwu He, Fujian Normal Univ. (China)
Zhifang Li, Fujian Normal Univ. (China)
Hui Li, Fujian Normal Univ. (China)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6534:
Fifth International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine

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